Danièle Bourcier is a French lawyer and essayist, who has contributed to the emergence of a new discipline in France: Law, Computing and linguistics. She is director of research emeritus at CNRS, lead of the "Law and Governance technologies" Department at the Centre for Administrative Science Research (CERSA) at the University Paris II, and associate researcher at the March Bloch Centre in Berlin and at the IDT laboratory of the Autonomous University of Barcelona. She leads various international and national legal expertise to the European Commission and the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF); Focus Group RTD-L.3; OECD (Group Genomics and Informatics-Privacy and Security Issues); the Dutch Royal Academy of Sciences (Legal Education and Technology) and Organisation internationale de la Francophonie (OIF). Recently (April 2016) she was invited as expert in artificial decision & Robot at UN Geneva (Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons, CCW). Member of the Commission of Reflection on the Ethics of Research in Science and Technology (CERNA) since 2012 She also works on the theory of complex systems applied to law, and the neuroconnexionnist networks. She conducts linguistic research on the legal language and argumentation, and finally the writing the law. This research led her to develop methods in legislative drafting in which she studied the development of new forms of coordination to agree on norms. Her study on digital communities in Europe have allowed her to explore the governance of commons. The research on Commons rooted in his implication in Creative Commons project. To be published: Open data et Big Data, Nouveaux défis pour la vie privée, Mare & Martin ed., juillet 2016.

Abstract

Artificial intelligence and law: what perspective?

Artificial intelligence (AI) has fed our imagination and our science fiction novels. Now it enters our professional life and robots become our assistants and even our companions. The two main issues of AI will be the interaction with human systems and the ability of machines to be autonomous.
Be heard by artificial intelligence, physical or virtual devices that replace the physical and cognitive activities of a living being. Autonomy of these devices will depend more and more on machine learning techniques. Then the key issues of autonomy from a legal perspective and ethics are liability issues. To the extent that the law is based on a certain idea of man as the subject responsible for his actions, these devices can influence the responsibility of those who create and use them. This effect is even stronger when it comes to replacing total human activities and decisions by machines.
Other legal issues are intellectual property, privacy and human dignity.
We briefly review the legal instruments currently available. Then beyond law, the debate will be opened to ethical considerations and the potential of soft law more likely to take into account the sensitive and evolutionary aspects of artificial intelligence applications in some areas of human activity (medicine, security, e-government, military robots and law).
What can systemics bring to the debate on interaction and autonomy? …..

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